Vacation Pics – Lost

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I could kick myself in the butt.  Sometime during my five days at the Copan Ruins I inadvertently changed the setting on my camera from the small pixel size that allows me to post photos onto my blog to the larger size that doesn’t unless I resize them, which takes a long time, especially when there are hundreds of pics.  Included here are the few I did take of the Copan Ruins in the smaller postable size.  My pics of Cancun, Merida, Yucatan and Guatemala will have to wait.  The Copan Ruins are quite large.  The very top left pic shows the paved path one can walk to reach the ruins from the town named Copan Ruinas, the area once a suburban living area of the ancient central ruling center where the largest pyramids and stone buildings housed the government and its bureaucracy.  The top two left pics next to the sendero (path) show how as the centuries passed the pyramids were built larger by successive dynasties, on top of existing structures.  The door of the second top left pic leads to the building seen in the cutout, a huge ceremonial center called the Rosalillo, discovered intact with much of its original color.  The stellae and works of art positioned throughout the Copan Ruins made me imagine myself walking amongst the teeming population living here when the highly advanced civilization that occupied the Copan Valley nestled among forested mountainous peaks was at its zenith over a thousand years ago, one of many similar Mayan cities across Maya territory.  I have returned to my duties in La Paz and expect to be posting more pics in the smaller pixel size soon.

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About Fortunato Velasquez

Fortunato Velasquez received his Registered Nurse's license from the State of California during the month that Neil Armstrong walked on the moon. On February 15, 2020, my friend and the director of the Fundación Señor San José in La Paz, La Paz, Honduras, Sister Edith Suazo Fernandez died at the age of 47. https://youtu.be/Poqcf0vn0qQ This a video of her funeral.

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