Category Archives: Everyday

15 May 2020 Covy

On 15 March 2020 there were 3 positive covy cases in Honduras. At the same time a woman flew in from Spain to attend a family baby shower.

On 22 March there were 26 covy cases. On 30 March there were 110 cases. On 8 April there were 312. Then covy got busy. On 28 April the cases jumped to 702. Today, 15 May 2020, there are 2,318 covy cases and 138 covy deaths.

Honduras’ population is only 8 million folks. Needless to say, the country is still on lockdown that began on 15 March 2020. Two months ago.

Movin’ Right Along

702 positive covy cases in Honduras this morning with 57 deaths. Not much compared to the US of Northamerica. But enough to keep the country on lock-down until next month. A bit of good news for the Children’s Home is the potential repair of our well pump so that we can have potable running water access 24/7. A representative of the Home’s benefactor with subsequent constuction 4 years ago came by Sunday to review the building. I had emailed the gentleman after returning from the States in January explaining the problem and the lack of money for repair. He never answered. Until this past Sunday. He must have heard my prayers.

The Children’s Home

I moved into the Children’s Home complex a year ago April 1, 2019. I left for my three-month road trip May 3rd. I returned home to Honduras from the US of North America on August 6th. In October I was hospitalized with Dengue Fever. I returned to the USNA in November 2019 for a gall bladder surgery at the Seattle VA Hospital, the operation completed on New Years Eve. A flight back to Honduras on January 7, 2020 seven days post-op was a very painful experience. My friend and mentor, Sister Edith, died on February 15, 2020. I live alone at the Children`s Home now paying the rent that keeps the complex from being abandoned and prey to squatters and thieves. My friend Celeste keeps me sane. There are now 312 positive diagnosed covid-19 casas in Honduras, 2 of them in La Paz. We are in for a long haul.

More Virus Lore

We now have 110 confirmed positive coronavirus cases in Honduras, and the populace is still still under curfew. In my opinion, this will not end for months. It is now the norm to wear a face mask when out of the home and to maintain two-meter distances from others when in line to buy food or any other needed basic item. One must consider human survival on the planet to be existential.

COVID-19

Life is getting kind of hairy and scary around here. Two weeks ago, there were two confirmed positive cases of the coronavirus in Honduras. It was traced to a woman traveling from Spain to a family baby shower. This morning there are 26 confirmed cases. Last week the country quarantined its citizens, closing down public transit as well as nonessential businesses. Tomorrow the president has ordered all citizens to remain in their homes for a week, until 29 March. I have been stocking up on nonperishable beans and rice. The situation will of course get worse in the next couple of months. Last year my life was full of crises. This year begins with a gigantic existential tsunami of woe from which no one is immune.

A Terrible Loss

Her presence is here. I have lived at the Children`s Home for almost a year. Once when I was in a rare depressive state she emailed - Animo, animo, animo, she told me. Cheer up. Be brave. Many days we would discuss the church and its philosophy. As the years passed, Sister Edith brought me back from an abyss to rejoin my lost faith. I miss her very much. https://youtu.be/Poqcf0vn0qQ This is how I said goodbye to my dear friend and associate, Sister Edith Suazo Fernandez. She has gone to heaven to sit at the right hand of God.

Sorry for my poor web page skills.

The Funeral

I returned yesterday night from Sister Edith’s burial. Hundreds of people visited the family home where everyone could say goodbye to my dear friend where she rested in her open coffin. The mortuary did a good job recreating her beauty and tranquility, even her small half-smile. You couldn`t tell if she was just asleep. More hundreds crowded into the local church for mass, people filling the doorways. When the pallbearers carried the casket to the cemetery, they plowed through the street crowded with more hundreds of trailing mourners as the sun set in shades of red and yellow. It was dark before the community that had come to pay their respects to a holy woman, a savior of children, dedicated to her God dispersed.
Edita once told me she had lived her life in 15s. She joined the Franciscan Congregation at 15 years old. She lived and worked as a nun for 15 years. Then she founded a missionary residence for at-risk children where she had taken care of unwanted and abandoned youngsters 24/7 for 15 years. And now, she said, what`s next. She admitted she was tired.

That Sinking Feeling

So much has happened since I returned to Honduras from the US on January 7th. Sister Edith returned home about the same date. She was being cared for by her mother and family at the family home. The Children’s Home is under legal attack by a government agency and an evangelical group seeking to take over the building for their own uses. I visited Sister Edith several times and saw she was very weak. Last night she was readmitted to the hospital with acute abdominal pain.